Dilemma in Japan

Dilemma in Japan

Dilemma in Japan

Dilemma in Japan

Excerpt

The defeat of Japan precipitates perhaps the most important Far Eastern political crisis of this century -- the decision as to what road Japan should travel in the postwar period. The future security and prosperity of the entire Pacific depend to a considerable extent on the road which is taken.

We are virtually as unprepared mentally to cope with the problem of Japan's postwar political future as we were to cope with the problems of war on Sunday, December 7, 1941. In the war years following that day, our energies have mainly been concentrated on the necessity for the utter destruction of Japan's militarist system and the punishment of those guilty of war crimes. We have come to recognize the need for bringing home to the Japanese people the fact of their defeat. These sentiments have been expressed in widespread popular support for the war aim of unconditional surrender. We have also determined to strip Japan of all territories it has gained by conquest. And we realize that we should and must maintain powerful military and naval forces in the postwar Pacific.

But we must also he prepared to go further . A sound and permanent peace cannot be based on military restraints alone. It can only be based on the uprooting of the basic political and economic forces which have propelled Japan along the disastrous road it has followed. We cannot afford to stand aloof, even in our armed might, and hope that somehow a peaceful Japanese political, economic and social structure will emerge . . .

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