Blood Revenge, War, and Victory Feasts among the Jibaro Indians of Eastern Ecuador

Blood Revenge, War, and Victory Feasts among the Jibaro Indians of Eastern Ecuador

Blood Revenge, War, and Victory Feasts among the Jibaro Indians of Eastern Ecuador

Blood Revenge, War, and Victory Feasts among the Jibaro Indians of Eastern Ecuador

Excerpt

The Jibaro Indians, who in their own language are called Shuāra, inhabit the virgin forests around the great rivers Pastaza, Morona, Upano-Santiago and their affluents, regions politically divided between the Republics of Ecuador and Peru, and still form one of the most numerous and most important Indian tribes of South America. Although some Jibaros live in parts of the country to which no white man has yet penetrated, their present total number can without exaggeration be estimated at fifteen or twenty thousand. The Jibaros are divided into a number of smaller tribes which are generally hostile to each other. They have no uniform tribal organization and do not recognize any common political authority. This division also stamps their social institutions and customs, which are somewhat different among different tribes. Against the whites the Jibaros have, in critical times, been able to maintain themselves as a united and homogeneous nation. The best proof of this is the general insurrection which, on account of the oppression of the Spaniards, was carried out in 1599 by all tribes living on the Upano, Paute, Santiago, and Morona, and at which the majority of the white population in the flourishing villages Sevilla de Oro, Logroño, and Mendoza were massacred by the Indians. Since that time the whites have, on the whole, left the Jibaros unmolested, but between themselves they have continued those destructive wars which more than anything else have contributed to the diminution of the Jibaro race.

The Jibaros no doubt at present are the most warlike of all Indian tribes in South America. The wars, the blood-feuds within the tribes, and the wars of extermination between the different tribes are continuous, being nourished by their superstitious belief in witchcraft. These wars are the greatest curse of the Jibaros and are felt to be so even by themselves, at least so far as the feuds within the tribes are concerned. On the other hand, the wars are to . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.