The Springs of Virginia: Life, Love and Death at the Waters, 1775-1900

The Springs of Virginia: Life, Love and Death at the Waters, 1775-1900

The Springs of Virginia: Life, Love and Death at the Waters, 1775-1900

The Springs of Virginia: Life, Love and Death at the Waters, 1775-1900

Excerpt

When George W. Featherstonhaugh, F.R.S., F.G.S., arrived at the White Sulphur Springs in August, 1834, he was possessed by an idea. The idea was, when the coach stopped, to leap out ahead of all the other passengers, and the object of that was to beat them to the "man in brown." Forewarned was forearmed. Over at the Warm Springs the Kentucky lady had told him how it would be. The White Sulphur was crowded to repletion, she said, and no matter how respectable you were, if you didn't come in your own carriage you were turned away without ceremony. The only possible way to get in at all was to wring the promise of a cabin from the man in brown. He controlled everything. And, said the lady from Kentucky, "if he wasn't the biggest liar that ever belonged to Virginia there was a great one to be born yet."

No matter how much of a liar he was, if he had to be tackled it would certainly be better to tackle him first than last. For over forty miles of hard jouncing, Mr. Feather stonhaugh . . .

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