Child Psychopathology: Diagnostic Criteria and Clinical Assessment

Child Psychopathology: Diagnostic Criteria and Clinical Assessment

Child Psychopathology: Diagnostic Criteria and Clinical Assessment

Child Psychopathology: Diagnostic Criteria and Clinical Assessment

Synopsis

These two companion volumes provide a comprehensive review and critical evaluation of the major DSM-III and DSM-III-R child disorders. Their major goal is to provide diagnostic and assessment guidelines that are based on scientific literature in specific clinical domains. Each chapter contains a discussion of the historical background of a particular diagnosis, definitional issues, a critical but selective review of the literature addressing the diagnosis in question, proposed changes in the diagnostic criteria based on the available literature, and proposed assessment models and methods based on the designated criteria. Given the scientific bases for many of these discussions of diagnostic criteria, these two volumes will serve professionals and graduate students in a wide variety of fields: clinical child psychology, child psychiatry, pediatrics, pediatric and school psychology, special education, social work, and other child mental health specialties.

Excerpt

It is indeed a pleasure to write the foreword to this text and its companion volume. One text focuses on child and adolescent psychopathology, and the other focuses on developmental disorders. Both volumes deal directly with evaluating the diagnostic criteria for these disorders, with a particular eye toward improving these criteria based on contemporary literature. Both volumes also focus on the clinical assessment of these disorders and related issues. Taken together, these two volumes should contribute to advancing the scientific study of child psychopathology and developmental disorders.

The scientific study of child and adolescent psychopathology does not have a very long history. Child psychiatry and the delivery of child mental health services grew up in the child guidance clinic movement of the 1920s. These clinics were designed for service delivery and operated on what became known as the "Holy Trinity Approach" to service delivery. That is, the child psychiatrist, who had no officially approved training in child and adolescent psychopathology, generally saw the child for play therapy; the psychologist saw the child for testing; and the social worker generally saw the family. These service delivery clinics did not promote research into the nature of the disorders that they were evaluating and treating and, as a result, there does not exist a serious body of scientific literature emanating from the large number of patients who were seen in those early years.

It wasn't until 1959 that the American Board of Psychiatry and Neu rology . . .

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