A Little Rebellion

A Little Rebellion

A Little Rebellion

A Little Rebellion

Excerpt

Since it is no secret that wars and revolutions seldom settle anything, the founding fathers of the republic should have been less startled than they were when shortly after the close of the American Revolution, in Massachusetts the minutemen marched again.

It happened in 1786. For the second time in a decade, the conch shells sounded on the village greens and the minutemen marched; they were not only animated by the same spirit that had impelled them on the road to Lexington, but many of them were the same men. They were supported by much of the old revolutionary paraphernalia: county conventions, committees of correspondence, resolutions solemnly taken. But this time they marched without the blessing of Boston, which in their eyes had replaced Britain as the Enemy. And they did not have the old leadership. Those men who so short a time ago had assured them that such conduct was logical, virtuous, and nobly patriotic now looked on aghast. George Washington wrung his hands and faced the fact that his dream of retiring to the placid obscurity of a country gentleman was premature; unfinished business demanded his attention. Sam Adams, who so recently had been at such pains to rouse them to a proper revolutionary pitch, looked on . . .

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