Reading Derrida Reading Joyce

Reading Derrida Reading Joyce

Reading Derrida Reading Joyce

Reading Derrida Reading Joyce

Synopsis

"The first full-length study of Jacques Derrida's criticism based upon the works of James Joyce. It is a brilliantly explicated study, clearly written, and eminently sensible. It will be the last word on the subject for years to come."--Zack Bowen, University of Miami

This book analyzes Derrida's uses of Joyce within his own work and demonstrates how Joyce's writings operate deconstructively.
The complex and tantalizing relationship between the two men has intrigued Joyceans and Derrideans alike. Alan Roughley here offers remarkable readings of both Joyce and Derrida texts, in particular of Finnegans Wake and Glas. Exploring how Joyce's ghost haunts many of Derrida's major writings, Roughley concentrates on two areas: how Derrida reads Joyce and sees his work as deconstructive and how English-speaking Joyceans have made use of Derrida's theories.
Long overdue, this is the first major comprehensive study of the relationship between Joyce and Derrida. It demonstrates specific ways in which the major works of one of the century's most important literary writers are some of the most powerful forces in the work of the century's most complex and controversial theorist. It will appeal to Joyceans of all persuasions, including anti-Derrideans, and to anyone with an interest in philosophy and contemporary theory. Alan Roughley is a research fellow at the University of York in the United Kingdom. He is the author of James Joyce and Critical Theory: An Introduction and Infernal Cinders: An Assemblage of Contemporary Writings, and the founding co-editor of Hypermedia Joyce, an international electronic journal of Joyce studies.

Excerpt

Alan Roughley gives us the first full-length study of the relationship between Jacques Derrida's criticism and the works of James Joyce. the ten chapters of his study fall into four sections. the first begins with Derrida's dissertation on the dualism of empirical language in Husserl and proceeds to the concept of marginality as it is used in Derrida's and Joyce's works. Here Roughley considers linguistically unexpressed phenomena as they stand unvocalized, and then their manifestations in language and as a part of a history that is in itself transient and arbitrary. the result is a sort of Husserl/Derrida antihistoricism that Derrida asserts was part of Joyce's concern, particularly in Finnegans Wake, although Stephen expresses the concept in the Nestor episode of Ulysses. in effect both Joyce and Husserl attempt to recapture the ideal Platonic form. in the second chapter Roughley interweaves Joyce's work with Derrida's concepts of Levinas, Arnold, and Heidegger, all in the ultimate framework of Hegel's dialectical opposites.

The three chapters of the second section discuss Joyce's less marginalized relationship to Derrida Glas, Dissemination, and The Post Card: From Socrates to Freud and Beyond. One of the highlights of the section deals with the lack of closure and the cyclical nature of the Wake. the chapters of the third section, "Speaking of Joyce," investigate Derrida's spoken words on Joyce within the context of the relationship between spoken and written (or printed) language that is so important in both Derrida's work and Finnegans Wake. They analyze what Derrida has said about Joyce on three different occasions. the first fully reveals the profound influence of . . .

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