Blossoms in the Dust: The Human Factor in Indian Development

Blossoms in the Dust: The Human Factor in Indian Development

Blossoms in the Dust: The Human Factor in Indian Development

Blossoms in the Dust: The Human Factor in Indian Development

Excerpt

On the stroke of midnight on 14th August, 1947, the Tricolour was hoisted to the strains of the national anthem. India became independent.

The monsoon night was starless but aglow with the brilliant illuminations below. Every man, woman and child was out to witness the supreme, historic moment and the air was filled with jubilant cries of "Jai Hind!".

An elemental force had burst its confines and swept like a flood across the land. Would it also wash away the cobwebs, the inertia and deadness of centuries? Would it create overnight a brave new country in which everything would be perfect? Anything seemed possible.

Next morning, the sun rose in the eastern sky to reveal the same squalor, the staggering poverty and hunger, the deep inequalities as the day before. Myriads of flowers, yellow and orange marigolds and pink rose petals, lay scattered on the ground, stale, scentless, trampled.

The municipal sweepers came and swept the streets, and the blossoms mingled in the dust.

2

An age and a journey had ended. In the same moment, however, another had begun.

Of the momentous events in the decade following independence, perhaps one of the most important in the long term perspective was the decision of the Indian Government to direct and regulate the pattern and tempo of future economic development in the country by state planning, followed by a declaration by the Indian Parliament . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.