Woman at Work: The Autobiography of Mary Anderson, as Told to Mary N. Winslow

Woman at Work: The Autobiography of Mary Anderson, as Told to Mary N. Winslow

Woman at Work: The Autobiography of Mary Anderson, as Told to Mary N. Winslow

Woman at Work: The Autobiography of Mary Anderson, as Told to Mary N. Winslow

Synopsis

"Any student who is interested in the role of woman in our industrial society will find this book to be required reading." American Sociological Review

Excerpt

When Mary Anderson and I embarked on the project of compiling a record of her life and work, there were several alternatives open to us. We could make it a careful study of certain phases of the development of women's participation in the organized labor movement and in industrial employment, but others more competent than we had already produced masses of reports on these subjects. We could make it an account of the dramatic progress of an immigrant girl from an ill-paid job as a domestic servant to a position of importance in the government of the United States, but hundreds of newspapers and magazines had already done this. We could make it the human story of a woman, showing what influenced her life and her character, and the part she played in the great movements of her time. This we have tried to do. the story is strictly autobiographical. It has been filtered but not embroidered. It is in Mary Anderson's own words, stenographically recorded during hours of conversation and interviews. Interpretations and editorial comment have been purposely omitted in the belief that the personality and quality of the author will emerge most clearly through her own objective statement.

I first became interested in Mary Anderson as a person in the early days of the Women's Bureau in the United States . . .

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