The South as a Conscious Minority, 1789-1861: A Study in Political Thought

The South as a Conscious Minority, 1789-1861: A Study in Political Thought

The South as a Conscious Minority, 1789-1861: A Study in Political Thought

The South as a Conscious Minority, 1789-1861: A Study in Political Thought

Excerpt

This is a study in the political thought of the Old South as a conscious minority seeking protection in the American Union from the political power of a Northern majority during the years 1789-1861. Only after considerable research did the thesis evolve into its present chapter headings, representing the major sources of Southern reliance for political protection throughout the Ante-Bellum Period. Further study disclosed a marked coincidence between sources of Southern protection and definite chronological data, so that the present work undertakes to treat the chief phases of Southern political thought in the order of their historical sequence. It is this analysis of a minority philosophy traced through its successive epochs of development that represents the possible contribution of this volume to the field of American political theory.

This study was originally prepared as a doctoral dissertation at Harvard University. It has been awarded the first Mrs. Simon Baruch University Prize offered biennially by the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

The book has been read in manuscript by Professor B. F. Wright, Jr., of Harvard University, Professor W. K. Boyd of Duke University, Professor E. C. Smith of New York University, and Dr. Matthew Page Andrews of Baltimore, Maryland. To these men the author is indebted for many valuable suggestions, and he wishes to acknowledge a special indebtedness to his colleague Professor Smith, who, in addition to his suggestions as to content, has painstakingly and most generously coöperated in the editing of the manuscript and in the reading of the page-proof. For courtesy, patience, and assistance in locating materials, further acknowledgments are extended to the library staffs at the Harvard University Library, the Duke University Library, and the New York Public Library, especially at the last-named where most of the final work of verification has been done.

J. T. C.

New York University, September 16, 1930.

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