Big Business and the Policy of Competition

Big Business and the Policy of Competition

Big Business and the Policy of Competition

Big Business and the Policy of Competition

Excerpt

This volume presents in revised form four lectures delivered in Cleveland in April 1955. They were sponsored jointly by Western Reserve University and Case Institute of Technology under a grant from the Merrill Foundation. Their purpose is to summarize the governmental policy toward big business which, in my opinon, is implied in the anti-trust laws, and state the rationale of that policy. To cover the broad subject with the brevity appropriate to four lectures, it has been necessary to make points baldly, present arguments compactly, and omit many qualifications and elaborations that would be pertinent in a longer statement.

Most of the problems of public policy that arise with reference to big business are generated not by the lively imaginations of public officials or academic observers but by clashes of economic interests, and primarily of business interests. Organized businessmen urge Government to use its power on their behalf or to modify traditional Government policies which they find inconvenient. Other organized businessmen propose conflicting courses of action. Single enterprises request that the Government curb the activity of other enterprises. A Government official cannot long encounter these rival pressures without realizing that businessmen are on all sides of most of the issues confronting him and that few of his decisions can be correctly described as either pro-business or anti-business. Prejudice for or against business as a whole, or any class thereof, is not only improper as a basis for official decision but also typically irrelevant to the issues that arise.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.