The Son of Apollo: Themes of Plato

The Son of Apollo: Themes of Plato

The Son of Apollo: Themes of Plato

The Son of Apollo: Themes of Plato

Excerpt

A GREEK was known in terms of the family and of the city he came from. These two sources of his being were intimately blended by the circumstances attending the history of his people. We may follow with confidence the movement of his organized social life from family economy to city economy and observe that, when he reflected, he seems to have been more interested in what the movement produced than in the causes which brought it about. He thought of his city with love and pride, as something like his family enlarged and organized, in idea at least, as a self-contained unit for the well-being of its members. This idea received a simple, yet thorough, expression in Aristotle who defined man in his social relations to his fellows in terms of the polis or city, calling him a 'political animal,' because it seemed natural for men to live in cities and arrange them for their own good by means of a suitable constitution. Man alone, he said, 'has a sense of good and . . .

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