International Claims: Their Adjudication by National Commissions

International Claims: Their Adjudication by National Commissions

International Claims: Their Adjudication by National Commissions

International Claims: Their Adjudication by National Commissions

Synopsis

The field of international claims is a billion-dollar business. Processing these claims is increasingly complex. This study gathers pertinent data to trace the history of national claims commissions, to evaluate their handling of procedural problems, & to determine their effect on international law. Acid-free reprint of Syracuse University Press, 1962. Distributed by William S. Hein & Co., Inc.

Excerpt

International claims, the remedial phase of substantive international law, is an area of vital concern to the American attorney, businessman, and student of international law. The growth of foreign trade and investment during this century has seen a corresponding increase in the number of international claims arising from social, political, or military disturbances throughout the world. One need look only to Cuba to see that international claims law has become a billion dollar business. This recent proliferation of claims, coupled with the reasonable expectation that the United States' Cuban experience soon may be repeated elsewhere in one or more of the so-called newer nations, has generated renewed interest in the study of various methods of peaceably resolving such disputes.

One device which the United States has utilized extensively during the past twenty-five years is the national (sometimes called domestic or municipal) claims commission. National commissions are creatures of municipal law established by the United States . . .

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