Dollars and Sense of Disarmament

Dollars and Sense of Disarmament

Dollars and Sense of Disarmament

Dollars and Sense of Disarmament

Excerpt

In the past year there has been a significant change in the climate of international relations. The political ice age of the Cold War may be coming to an end. Peace through disarmament has become the central theme of world diplomacy and national politics. Powerful men bitterly oppose this trend, but other men of influence are shifting previous positions to support the ineluctable necessity of disarmament. Recent and heartening examples in America are the speeches of Emil Mazey, secretary-treasurer of the United Auto Workers, A.F.L.-C.I.O., and of Senator John F. Kennedy. Said Mr. Mazey in Chicago on Feb. 20, 1960: "I am deeply concerned with the real possibility of an atomic-missile war.... I have, therefore, reached the conclusion that there is no alternative to peace." At Durham, N.H., on March 7, 1960, Senator Kennedy stated: "Peace programs involve risks ... but the risks of war are even more dangerous. There is no greater defense against total nuclear destruction than total nuclear disarmament."

Powerful assistance to the cause of peace was given in January, 1960, by a group of Americans who probably represent the most massive concentration of intellect per cubic inch of cranium anywhere in our country--the Federation of Atomic Scientists.

Since Hiroshima and Nagasaki these atomic scientists have brooded over the awful power they unleashed and have watched with despair the growth of the armaments race. They knew the only exit to this race was genocide on a dreadful scale. They made a visual symbol for their despair, "The Clock of Doom," a clock face which was published in the first issue of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists fifteen years ago. The hands, at that time, showed eight minutes to midnight, midnight being the outbreak of nuclear war. The clock has appeared in each issue of the magazine ever since, month after month for fifteen years, a constant reminder of how close humanity was to terrible destruction. Twice the minute hand jumped forward, once in 1949 when the Soviet Union tested the atom bomb and again in 1953 when the Soviet Union tested its thermonuclear bomb, the H-bomb. The last issue of . . .

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