Andrew Marvell

Andrew Marvell

Andrew Marvell

Andrew Marvell

Excerpt

When Andrew Marvell died in 1678 his admirers mourned him as a verse satirist and pamphleteer whose attacks on the Court and on the pretensions of the Anglican episcopate had made him obnoxious to the government of Charles II. His contemporaries would have been astonished at two of the tributes paid to him in 1921, when the borough of Hull celebrated the tercentenary of his birth: T. S. Eliot defined the peculiar distinction of his greatest poems (none of which was published in his lifetime); and the eminent Anglican divine, Hensley Henson, Bishop of Durham, praised him for the constancy of his religious faith and the disinterestedness of his life. We may find it strange that one man should have acquired two such divergent reputations-- the first depicting him as a violent, audacious, political satirist, the second emphasizing the fineness of his lyrical sensibility and the urbane, civilized quality of his metaphysical wit. A study of his life and of his works may show that both these reputations are well deserved and that each is consistent with the other.

Andrew Marvell's father, also named Andrew, was an Anglican clergyman strongly influenced by Calvinist doctrine, who in 1624 became 'Lecturer' of Holy Trinity Church, Hull, and Master of the Charterhouse. His home was in the rural parts just outside the bustle of the town, so Andrew Marvell the Younger, who was born at Winestead in Holderness, near Hull, on March 31, 1621, grew up among the sounds and sights and smells of the countryside.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.