Colour Prejudice in Britain: A Study of West Indian Workers in Liverpool, 1941-1951

Colour Prejudice in Britain: A Study of West Indian Workers in Liverpool, 1941-1951

Colour Prejudice in Britain: A Study of West Indian Workers in Liverpool, 1941-1951

Colour Prejudice in Britain: A Study of West Indian Workers in Liverpool, 1941-1951

Excerpt

This book is an account of the assimilation and adjustment of 345 West Indian Negroes who came to England between 1941 and 1943, many of whom have stayed to the present day. The study endeavours to trace the relationships between this group of West Indians and the English people with whom they came in contact over a period of approximately ten years. It is therefore a study in the two related fields of immigration and racial relations.

Ethnic minorities and immigrant groups in their relations with others in society have been intensively studied, especially in America during the last fifty years, and a well-established body of hypotheses concerning inter-group relations now exists. In the present research an attempt has been made to examine the pattern of behaviour which emerged between the West Indian Negroes and other groups with which they had contact in England, in the light of a general theory of inter-group relations based mainly upon American experience. The different cultural and historical background to racial relations and immigration in England might be expected to influence the resulting behaviour of the groups, leading to significant comparisons and contrasts with experience elsewhere. Where American experience appears to be repeated, the evidence provided by the circumstances of somewhat different social context should provide added confirmation of the universality of the general theory.

In the introductory chapter a general theory of inter-group relations is outlined, followed by a brief discussion of the main research methods and field techniques employed in the enquiry. The second chapter is devoted to a comparative discussion of the background to racial relations in Britain and America. Readers who are primarily interested in the concrete evidence contained in the report may wish to commence reading at Chapter III. This and subsequent chapters contain a systematic account of the experiences of the West Indian workers in Britain. In the concluding chapter an attempt is made to relate the findings to . . .

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