Drug Precipice: Illicit Drugs, Organised Crime, Fallacies of Legalisation, Worsening Problems, Solutions

Drug Precipice: Illicit Drugs, Organised Crime, Fallacies of Legalisation, Worsening Problems, Solutions

Drug Precipice: Illicit Drugs, Organised Crime, Fallacies of Legalisation, Worsening Problems, Solutions

Drug Precipice: Illicit Drugs, Organised Crime, Fallacies of Legalisation, Worsening Problems, Solutions

Synopsis

Guide for people involved in policy formulation, drug education, health care workers and those concerned with the effects of drug use. Provides information about the health and social dangers of illicit drugs, legal drug markets and organised crime. Discusses the possible effects of decriminalising the use, supply and sale of illicit drugs and provides information about international drug policy and United Nations Conventions. Includes a brief history of drug use, references, a bibliography and an index. Mofitt is a former Royal Commissioner examining the infiltration of organised crime into Australia. Malouf is president of the Australian Pharmacists Against Drug Abuse and Thompson is a magistrate with experience in both adult and children's courts.

Excerpt

Australian of the year 1982
Wueenslander of the year 1983
Wueensland Supreme Court Judge 1971-84
Royal Commissioner on Drugs--Inquiry into Drugs--Australian, Victorian,
Queensland, Western Australian and Tasmanian governments
(Williams Royal Commission) 1977-80
Member of International Narcotic Control Board, Vienna (UN) 1982-87
Chairman of Queensland Government Inquiry into Abuse of Drugs 1975
Queensland Representative on (former) Federal National Drug Advisory Council

It was a delight (and a quite humbling experience) to receive a letter from my friend of many years, Athol Moffitt, offering me the opportunity to compose the foreword to Drug Precipice.

Any production to which Athol puts his name is worth reading. Drug Precipice may well be his 'finest hour'. From its style and presentation I deduce that he has, at the least, played his part in producing yet another timely plea to Australians All (and others) to get active in the drug abuse conflict before it is too late.

We were first formally warned by him in his hard-hitting report from his Royal Commission of Inquiry 1973-74. It dealt not only with the infiltration of organised crime into the operations of nsw registered clubs, but also with his perception of how the tentacles of organised crime could spread into other illegal (and legal) operations and in the process destroy our prized Australian way of life. Like a flock of ostriches faced with danger, most of the Australian public continued to ignore his message.

Having patiently sat by and awaited the hoped-for improvements in the fight against illegal drugs, consequent upon the reports of Woodward, Williams, Costigan and Stewart Inquiries, frustration and disappointment . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.