Stories from the Greek Comedians: Aristophanes, Philemon, Diphilus, Menander, Apollodorus

Stories from the Greek Comedians: Aristophanes, Philemon, Diphilus, Menander, Apollodorus

Stories from the Greek Comedians: Aristophanes, Philemon, Diphilus, Menander, Apollodorus

Stories from the Greek Comedians: Aristophanes, Philemon, Diphilus, Menander, Apollodorus

Excerpt

It has been said that the Greeks had three schools of comedy, -- the old, the middle, and the new. The old was the "Comedy of Politics." It took the form of extravaganza or farce. The reader will find nine specimens of it in this volume, all taken from Aristophanes, who indeed is the only writer of this school that is left to us. With the middle we need not now concern ourselves. Possibly we may get some idea of what it was like from the Women in Parliament and the Plutus, two of Aristophanes's later plays. The new comedy was the "Comedy of Manners." It may be compared with the dramas that bear this name on the modern stage, and also with the ordinary novel. We have it only in the translations of Plautus and Terence.

I have dealt very freely with my originals, not indeed adding anything, but leaving out much, translating sometimes, and sometimes paraphrasing. Of the liberty which I have allowed myself, I may give an instance. In the Acharnians I have in one place . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.