Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology

Excerpt

Writing a book requires one to select among ideas, generalizations and supporting data, and to emphasize some theoretical conceptions over others. This process of winnowing is inevitably influenced by the author's predilections and preferences. This being so, perhaps the student can profit from a statement of my conscious assumptions and preferences, as well as from a general statement of the possible and intended uses of this book.

This text was written in the light of an assumption about the nature of the teaching-learning process--that teaching activities are essentially professional. While teaching is commonly called a profession, the sense in which the word "profession" will be used here is not common, meaning "an avocation whose activities are subjected to theoretical analysis and are modified by theoretical conclusions derived from that analysis." We are all aware that not every teacher views his work in terms of this definition. It is a major premise of this book, however, that teaching ought to be a profession in this sense of the word. This text has been written to demonstrate that teaching activities can be subjected to theoretical analysis and modified by that analysis.

In this respect, we can distinguish teaching from a "craft," which is "an avocation based upon customary activities and modified by the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.