Ten Studies in the Poetry of Matthew Arnold

Ten Studies in the Poetry of Matthew Arnold

Ten Studies in the Poetry of Matthew Arnold

Ten Studies in the Poetry of Matthew Arnold

Excerpt

The publication in 1932 of Arnold's letter to Clough, followed in 1940 by the Commentary of Tinker and Lowry and by the Poetical Works from the same editors in 1950, has, given students of Arnold's poetry a new impetus and a new security. And to these volumes must be added the massive Essai de biographie psychologique (with bibliography) by Professor Bonnerot in 1947.

Arnold's poetry has always been appreciated and enjoyed by select readers, but it can hardly be called popular, and it has always seemed a little dry, and even artificial, to many. It separated itself from the main movement of popular Victorian poetry; it lacked the sunset glow of Romanticism by which Tennyson flourished (and inversely Browning) and by whose fading light Rossetti and Swinburne shone. It was limited in scope and in time. The first two volumes, 1849 and 1852 . . .

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