American Minorities: A Textbook of Readings in Intergroup Relations

American Minorities: A Textbook of Readings in Intergroup Relations

American Minorities: A Textbook of Readings in Intergroup Relations

American Minorities: A Textbook of Readings in Intergroup Relations

Excerpt

For more than half a century American sociologists and othersocial scientists have been making available a vast and rich store ofliterature on the relations between racial, religious, and nationality(ethnic) groups in the United States. Few, if any, other social problems in America have been subject to so much theoretical analysis andempirical research. Nevertheless it has been virtually impossible tomake readily available to courses on intergroup relations an adequatesampling of this literature.

This volume represents an attempt to remedy the situation. Theeditor has selected, in many cases excerpted, and integrated what heconsiders to be the more pertinent and readable articles, essays, andchapters in social science literature on the problems of Americanminorities. The organization and development of the book are adaptedto the general scheme that has become standard in most sociologycourses on "race" relations, intergroup relations, and Americanminority groups. Section I, the Introduction, is concerned primarilywith providing a broad perspective on the problems of dominant andminority group relations throughout the world. It concludes with asummary picture of the composition of American society racially andethnically. Section II is a coverage of the characteristics of race,religion, and nationality, the three primary types of dominant andminority group alignment.

Prejudice and discrimination, the key components in all problemsof intergroup relations, are defined and analyzed in Section III. Themajor theories that have been formulated to explain these problems,and illustrations of prejudice and discrimination in our media ofcommunication and in college admissions are also included here.Section IV deals with the numerically small but sociologically important aboriginal element in American society, the Indians. In Section V

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