Public Control of Labor Relations: A Study of the National Labor Relations Board

Public Control of Labor Relations: A Study of the National Labor Relations Board

Public Control of Labor Relations: A Study of the National Labor Relations Board

Public Control of Labor Relations: A Study of the National Labor Relations Board

Excerpt

The administrative method of public control is not new nor may it be said to be old. It may perhaps best be regarded as in process of formation, and this study was made because we have not yet crystallized the relationship of law and economics.

The plan of study was formulated with the purpose of making a close and detailed observation of the National Labor Relations Board and its functions, not only for purposes of appraisal, but also to relate the experience of this agency to the basic problems that are attached to the use of a public administrative agency to control relationships in various segments of the economy. The study is divided into six parts. Part I describes the legislative background of the National Labor Relations Act. Part II deals with unfair labor practices proscribed by the Act. Part III analyzes the problems confronting the Board in the certification of collective bargaining representatives. Part IV considers in detail the procedures of the Board. Part V is concerned with organization and personnel. Part VI portrays the Board's record, considers public policy, and appraises the Board and the administrative process. Appraisal of the Act, the Board, and the administrative method, however, is interwoven throughout the entire study.

It is impossible to rank source material in terms of importance. Much reliance was of course placed upon Board reports, Board cases and decisions, and Board press releases. Numerous congressional hearings and reports were a fruitful source of information. Court decisions were of necessity much used. In the instances where particular information was sought from the Board, cooperation was forthcoming. Some books and monographs in the field of labor relations and administrative law were drawn upon.

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