The Development of Sociology

The Development of Sociology

The Development of Sociology

The Development of Sociology

Excerpt

The account of the history of sociology offered in the following pages is intended to be comprehensive but not exhaustive. It is inevitable that, in the preparation of such an account, considerable reliance will be placed upon secondary sources; although sociology is, relatively, a "new science," it is old enough to have a literature too extensive for any one person to have first-hand acquaintance with all of it. Largely because such secondary sources are much more adequate for the development of general social thought down to the latter part of the nineteenth centurythan for the recent period, Part II of this book is admittedly a more complete treatment of the subjects covered than the subsequent parts. The excellent volumes of W. A. Dunning Political Theories, and J. P. Lichtenberger Development of
Social Theory, in particular, have done much to lighten the task of all subsequent writers in their field; while P. A. Sorokin, in Contemporary Sociological Theories, has brought together in conveniently accessible form a large amount of information concerning modern sociological literature. The extent of my dependence upon the volumes of the Encyclopaedia of the Social
Sciences will be apparent to anyone who scans the footnotes in the following pages.

The serious student who may wish to use this book as a guide to further study is warned that there are several significant recent and contemporary developments in scientific sociology that are omitted or only barely mentioned in the following pages, owing chiefly to the author's lack of acquaintance with them. Among these are the German Wissens-soziologie (sociology of knowledge) school, established by Max Scheler, Franz Jerusalem, Karl Mannheim, and others; the Kultursoziologieschool founded by Alfred Weber, brother of the better known Max Weber; the recent work of Morris Ginsburg at the University of London; the activities of the Solvay Institute at Brussels; the recent activities of the International Institute of Sociology . . .

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