The King and the Imperial Crown: The Powers and Duties of His Majesty

The King and the Imperial Crown: The Powers and Duties of His Majesty

The King and the Imperial Crown: The Powers and Duties of His Majesty

The King and the Imperial Crown: The Powers and Duties of His Majesty

Excerpt

It is the conviction of the public in the self-governing Dominions of the Crown that the Governor-General in matters official serves no more distinguished purpose than that of a "rubber stamp." Goldwin Smith popularised the idea in Canada, so effectively that the sudden assertion in 1926 of the rights of the Crown by Lord Byng came as a dangerous innovation and excited a measure of disapproval which it proved difficult to explain to observers in the United Kingdom. Since that date a vital change has been effected in the position of the Governor-General. By a decision of the Imperial Conference of 1930 he ceased to be the independent head of the Dominion government and became the nominee of the Dominion government, subject to removal at the pleasure of that government. There has therefore come to pass a position in which in truth the representative of the Crown may be said to have no possibility of exercising authority outside the social sphere.

But the Crown in the United Kingdom occupies a very different position. The Governor-General is a transient phantom; amid the flux of ministries the king remains, gaining in experience and judgment with the passing of the years. The Governor-General has but scanty sources of knowledge to guide him in crises; the king has access to a vast store of carefully . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.