The International Dimension of Post-Communist Transitions in Russia and the New States of Eurasia

The International Dimension of Post-Communist Transitions in Russia and the New States of Eurasia

The International Dimension of Post-Communist Transitions in Russia and the New States of Eurasia

The International Dimension of Post-Communist Transitions in Russia and the New States of Eurasia

Synopsis

The collapse of the Soviet Union had the simultaneous effect of demolishing the international political order of the past half-century, with consequences for all sides. Western policy makers, no less than the leaders of the region, had to reorient themselves to a new world -- knowing that their actions might impact developments in unexpected ways.

This concluding volume of the International Politics of Eurasia series takes on the challenge of specifying the forces at work in the International environment of Russia and the New Independent States and gauging the impact of external actors on developments in this region. Among the topics covered are foreign and security policies; relationships with East Asian, Near Eastern, and Western States; and the impact of international economic and financial institutions, development assistance and advisory programs of various kinds, and aid organizations.

Excerpt

This book is the last in a series of ten volumes produced by the Russian Littoral Project, sponsored jointly by the University of Maryland at College Park and the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University. As directors of the project, we share the conviction that the transformation of the former Soviet republics into independent states demands systematic analysis of the determinants of the domestic and foreign policies of the new countries. This series of volumes is intended to provide a basis for comprehensive scholarly study of these issues.

This volume was shaped by our view that despite the dramatic growth of high-quality Western scholarship on post-Soviet developments, the interaction between external influences and trends in Russia and the other post-Soviet countries has not received systematic scholarly analysis. the influence of outside actors on post-Soviet affairs is poorly understood, although vigorous assertions about the connection are regularly voiced in response to Western policy makers' unavoidable need to deal with new developments in Eurasia. the lack of systematic study is due partly to the short interval that has elapsed since the breakup of the ussr, but it has other causes as well.

Most Western observers have yet to recognize the general need for systematic study of the interaction between the post-Soviet states and the outside world. To a large extent, Western specialists on the successor states have devoted their efforts to charting the torrents of exciting events inside these countries, leaving little time for broader-gauged studies. in addition, scholarly observers have always found it difficult to analyze international affairs as a process of interaction among decisions made in many states, rather than as the decisions taken by one state in response to other states whose policies are assumed to be more or less permanently fixed. in other words, the analysis of international relations has often been confused with the analysis of a given nation's foreign policy. Partly as a consequence, U.S. observers eager to influence American foreign policy . . .

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