Renaissance and Renascences in Western Art

Renaissance and Renascences in Western Art

Renaissance and Renascences in Western Art

Renaissance and Renascences in Western Art

Excerpt

As will be seen from the Author's Preface, this book is based on some of Professor Erwin Panofsky's lectures and seminars during a week in the summer of 1952 at Gripsholm Castle which houses the Swedish National Portrait Gallery. The texts have been revised and considerably amplified. The occasion developed into a symposium in which teachers and graduate students from all the universities and major museums of Sweden participated. The Institute of Art History of the University of Uppsala was responsible for the arrangements, but the symposium as well as this publication was made possible by the generous financial assistance of the Gottesmann Foundation.

As an inter-academic affair taking place outside Uppsala--although in surroundings that to our students of the history of art have become a kind of Akademia--this symposium was unique in the series of Gottesmann lectures. It has, accordingly, been considered appropriate to include the publication both in this series and in the Figura series, published by the Institute of Art History of the University of Uppsala.

The first-mentioned series has now been concluded, and this provides an admirable opportunity to recall the circumstances of its origin.

In November, 1947, D. S. Gottesmann sent a letter to the Swedish Consul General in New York, from which the following passages are quoted: "For quite some time I have felt that the acts of mercy on the part of the Swedish people and the Swedish Government during the war and since the conclusion of hostilities have not been fully recognized. While words of appreciation have been expressed from time to time, I have felt very strongly that these expressions of appreciation and gratitude should have taken a more concrete form."

On December 2nd, 1947, this letter was followed by a deed of gift to the University of Uppsala. The sum of $50,000 was donated "for the purpose of enabling the University to arrange for a series of lectures by world-renowned persons, irrespective of nationality, in the field of the humanities". The donation served as an expression of gratitude for certain Swedish initiatives, especially on the part of the late King Gustav V, in organizing aid to the Jews of the nazi-dominated countries . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.