Twentieth-Century American Foreign Policy

Twentieth-Century American Foreign Policy

Twentieth-Century American Foreign Policy

Twentieth-Century American Foreign Policy

Excerpt

The present volume is the third in the series "Modern America," dealing with the problems of change and continuity in twentieth-century United States history. The first, Change and Continuity in Twentieth-Century America, was published by the Ohio State University Press in 1964; the second, Change and Continuity in Twentieth-Century America: The 1920's, in 1968. The eleven essays comprising this volume explore aspects of, and issues in, American foreign policy in the storm-tossed years since the beginning of this century.

Two of the essays are historiographical. Charles E. Neu of Brown University analyzes the changing assumptions and presuppositions underlying the writing of American diplomatic history from its coming of age in the 1920s to the present in his paper "The Changing Interpretive Structure of American Foreign Policy." In his "Writings on American Foreign Relations: 1957 to the Present," David F. Trask of the State University of New York -- Stony Brook surveys the major scholarly works on American foreign policy and diplomacy of the last decade -- a decade exceptionally rich in important new contributions.

Waldo H. Heinrichs, Jr., of the University of Illinois ( Urbana-Champaign), in his paper "Bureaucracy and Professionalism in the Development of American Career Diplomacy," traces the development in the twentieth century of an American career foreign service -- and in so doing, illuminates an aspect of diplomatic history hitherto too largely ignored.

Three of the essays are concerned with the changing relationship between the United States and the rest of the world. Paul A. Varg of Michigan State University reexamines the question "The United States a World Power, 1900-1917: Myth or Reality?", and finds that the answer depends upon which part of the world you are talking about. Manfred Jonas of Union College documents the continuing American resistance during the 1930s to any form of collective security in his paper "The United States and the Failure of Collective Security in the 1930s." Lawrence S. Kaplan of Kent State University, in his essay "The United States and the Atlantic Alliance: The First Generation," shows how the United States in the aftermath of World War II abandoned its traditional isolationism by taking the lead in the formation and maintenance of NATO.

The remaining essays appraise United States relations with a specific foreign country. Robert Craig Brown of the University of Toronto, in his paper "Canada in North America," reviews twentieth-century United States-Canadian relations from the Canadian viewpoint. Lyle C. Brown of Baylor University and James W. Wilkie of the University of California -- Los Angeles detail and explain the dramatic improvement in United States-Mexican relations since World War II in their paper "Recent United States -- Mexican Relations: Problems Old and New." Allan R. Millett of Ohio State University provides in "The United States and Cuba: The Uncomfortable Abrazo, 1898-1968" an account of the historical back- . . .

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