A Guide to the History of Bacteriology

A Guide to the History of Bacteriology

A Guide to the History of Bacteriology

A Guide to the History of Bacteriology

Excerpt

In this so-called "age of science," history is caught seemingly about everything but science. In most universities there is at least a professor of the history of religion and one of the history of art, but rarely one of the history of science. At the present time there are only five universities in the United States where one can receive advanced training in this field; they include Brown, Cornell, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, and Wisconsin. One of the primary needs concerning the study of the history of science is simply recognition. The subject has lacked support and personnel. What we need are more modern historians of science that are men of wisdom and, in a sense, the real guardians of ideals that will aid us to understand science.

The history of science is concerned primarily with its own discipline--science itself. It will indicate man's progress with material things, his progress of understanding nature, and his development of his own consciousness, since science is based on truth. Thus, the central point of modern civilization has been the development of science, yet its history has been sadly neglected.

The historian's sacred duty is to tell of the discoveries of truth and to indicate their evolution as well as how they were transmitted and received by others. A new concept in science is seldom seen or even understood from the first presentation, at least not the whole of it. Furthermore, the great discoveries do not appear like lightning out of the sky. All have had long periods of evolution and many times the pressures for the changes are almost secret. One may see this part of it, or that, and only gradually realize the implications. In many instances the discoverers do not appreciate what they have revealed. In numerous cases so called lesser men may "carry the ball," and even these . . .

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