Content Analysis: A Handbook with Applications for the Study of International Crisis

Content Analysis: A Handbook with Applications for the Study of International Crisis

Content Analysis: A Handbook with Applications for the Study of International Crisis

Content Analysis: A Handbook with Applications for the Study of International Crisis

Excerpt

The concepts, contents, methods, sources, and results contained in this handbook have emerged from a comparative study of historical crises undertaken by the Studies in International Conflict and Integration at Stanford University.

In February, 1960, the Ford Foundation awarded Stanford University funds to enlarge the research and teaching program in the processes of international conflict and integration. Already under way on an exploratory basis, this project had been applying techniques from several disciplines to the study of international relations. As developed since that time, the studies in International Conflict and Integration have become a systematic inquiry into the nature, processes, and effects of conflict and integration in transactions between nation states.

Actually, the enterprise began in the autumn of 1957 with a small voluntary inter-disciplinary seminar of the Stanford University faculty interested in international relations. The faculty met twice a month to consider how problems of international relations could be formulated and analyzed with greater insight, precision, and result. Underlying faculty discontent with prevailing approaches to international relations was the sober realization that successes in the physical sciences and technology had far outstripped our knowledge of human behavior and our control of human conflicts-especially on the world level. Among the fifteen or twenty persons who met each fortnight were men and women from political science, history, economics, psychology, sociology, anthropology, education, law, physics, and electronics. From the beginning there was notable consensus about the magnitude of the challenge and the inadequacies of tools at hand. There was much less agreement on what should be done.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.