Oceanography; Invited Lectures Presented at the International Oceanographic Congress Held in New York, 31 August-12 September 1959

Oceanography; Invited Lectures Presented at the International Oceanographic Congress Held in New York, 31 August-12 September 1959

Oceanography; Invited Lectures Presented at the International Oceanographic Congress Held in New York, 31 August-12 September 1959

Oceanography; Invited Lectures Presented at the International Oceanographic Congress Held in New York, 31 August-12 September 1959

Excerpt

The International Oceanographic Congress was a great day for oceanography. Some of us who attended it had been scientific sailors since we were very young. We could not have imagined in those days that we would meet one day in a great assembly with representatives from two thirds of all the earth's nations.

It was fitting that the Congress should be held in the home of the United Nations, for the marine sciences are peculiarly international. Not only can scientists of every continent and every country contribute to knowledge of the seas, but it is also necessary that they do so if our understanding is to increase.

From another point of view also, it was appropriate that those who are concerned with learning about the oceans, which are the property of no man and no nation but the heritage of every man and every nation, should meet in a building that belongs to no nation but to all mankind. By the ironies of science in our terrible century, the very existence of our human species is threatened while at the same time populations everywhere are exploding in size. No one knows how to predict or control what will happen to human society. We do know we must learn to govern our planet, to accept rationally and use wisely the planetary home in which all men are imprisoned. A first step in planetary government might well be the development of a wise and far-seeing international government of the oceans. But such governments depend on understanding. Oceanographers have a grave responsibility to the United Nations to achieve the understanding on which an international government of the oceans can be based.

Just as the United Nations is the meeting place for all the nations, the science of the sea is a meeting place for all the sciences. There are several definitions of oceanography, or oceanology, as many of my friends prefer to call it. Some say it is not a science at all, others that oceanography is what oceanographers do, or simply the science that is done at sea. I have had some success in . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.