The Treaty Veto of the American Senate

The Treaty Veto of the American Senate

The Treaty Veto of the American Senate

The Treaty Veto of the American Senate

Excerpt

During the last thirty years the United States Senate has repeatedly stirred a large volume of controversy by refusing to approve, without extensive qualification, important treaties sponsored by the President. Bitter clashes, extending to the American people, have resulted, from which the writer has not been insulated. On the contrary, he has watched the greatest of these struggles with a degree of interest which will disqualify the present account from the standpoint of those believing that history must not be written by contemporaries who have had convictions upon the issues of their day.

Others not concerned about the final verdicts of history will feel, not unnaturally, that one who believes in the organization of world peace should not describe the action of Senators in opposition to this movement. The author can ask from these readers no greater effort to weigh all the evidence fairly than he has been able to put into his own work. It is his position that the failure of treaties for the advancement of peace in the administration of every President since Benjamin Harrison left office, in 1893, creates a situation which calls for study and appraisal. His findings are presented, not as a final word on the subject, but as a contribution to discussion. The reader is entitled to his own conclusions and to express them. Any new evidence bearing upon the controversial questions discussed ought also to be added to the record.

I am glad to record my obligation to Professors James W. Garner, John A. Fairlie, Clarence A. Berdahl and Lau rence M. Larson . . .

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