The Fundamental Questions of Philosophy

The Fundamental Questions of Philosophy

The Fundamental Questions of Philosophy

The Fundamental Questions of Philosophy

Excerpt

There are two classes of readers for whom this book isspecially intended, first, university students who have just begun the study of philosophy, and, secondly, those who, without having had the advantage of being at a university, wish to acquire by private reading some idea of what philosophy is and of the great topics with which it deals. I have tried very hard to make the book clear for both these classes, but it is best to realize at the start that it is not possible for a man to enter on the study of philosophy without real hard mental work, however much is done to make his task easier. Many philosophers, whose ranks I hope I have not joined, have been and are very much to blame for making the subject unnecessarily obscure by their manner of presentation, but the nature of the subject-matter is such as to forbid the sort of effortless understanding we may have of a novel.

Professor Dorothy Emmet and Mr. G. E. Hughes have kindly helped me by reading the last chapter and making valuable criticisms. My indirect debts to those whose books I have read on philosophy or who have had verbal discussions with me in the past are naturally in the case of a book of this kind too numerous to recount.

A. C. EWING

Trinity Hall Cambridge . . .

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