Outlines of the History of Ethics for English Readers

Outlines of the History of Ethics for English Readers

Outlines of the History of Ethics for English Readers

Outlines of the History of Ethics for English Readers

Excerpt

In order to assist the reader in grasping and arranging the somewhat compressed historical matter presented to him in this book, I have thought it desirable to prefix a brief conspectus of the three periods treated in Chapters II. III. and IV. respectively.

I. -- GREEK AND GRECO-ROMAN ETHICS

The first of the three great divisions of my subject -- the history of Greek and Greco-Roman Ethics -- is most naturally subdivided again into Pre-Socratic Ethics, Socratico-Platonic- Aristotelian Ethics, and Post-Aristotelian Ethics. If we use these as definite chronological divisions, the first period may be taken to extend till somewhere about 430 B.C., when the new dialectic of Socrates began to impress the Athenian public: the second may be taken to end either with the death of Aristotle (322 B.C.), or with the approximately simultaneous appearance of Zeno and Epicurus as teachers at Athens, near the end of the 4th century; the third may be extended, if we like, to the suppression of the schools of philosophy at Athens by the orthodox zeal of Justinian, 529 A.D.; but I have not tried to carry the reader's interest . . .

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