An Ethical Problem or Sidelights upon Scientific Experimentation on Man and Animals

An Ethical Problem or Sidelights upon Scientific Experimentation on Man and Animals

An Ethical Problem or Sidelights upon Scientific Experimentation on Man and Animals

An Ethical Problem or Sidelights upon Scientific Experimentation on Man and Animals

Excerpt

It is now somewhat over a third of a century since my attention was specially directed to the abuses of animal experimentation. In January, 1880, a paragraph appeared in a morning paper of New York referring to the late Henry Bergh. With his approval a Bill had come before the legislature of the State of New York providing for the abolition of all experiments upon living animals -- whether in medical colleges or elsewhere -- on the ground that they were without benefit to anybody, and demoralizing alike to the teacher and student. As I dropped the paper, it occurred to me that the chances of success would have been far greater if less had been asked. That certain vivisections were atrocious was undoubtedly true; but, on the other hand, there were some experiments that were absolutely painless. Would it not be wiser to make some distinctions?

The attempt was made. An article on the subject was at once begun, and in July of the same year it was published in Scribner's Magazine, the predecessor of the Century. So far as known, it was the first argument that ever found expression in the pages of any American periodical favouring not the entire abolition of vivisection, but the reform of its abuse.

My knowledge of vivisection had its beginning in . . .

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