The Survivors of the Chancellor: Diary of J. R. Kazallon, Passenger

The Survivors of the Chancellor: Diary of J. R. Kazallon, Passenger

Read FREE!

The Survivors of the Chancellor: Diary of J. R. Kazallon, Passenger

The Survivors of the Chancellor: Diary of J. R. Kazallon, Passenger

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Charleston , September 27th , 1869. -- It is high tide, and three o'clock in the afternoon when we leave the Battery-quay; the ebb carries us off shore, and as Captain Huntly has hoisted both main and top sails, the northerly breeze drives the "Chancellor" briskly across the bay. Fort Sumter ere long is doubled, the sweeping batteries of the mainland on our left are soon passed, and by four o'clock the rapid current of the ebbing tide has carried us through the harbor. mouth.

But as yet we have not reached the open sea; we have still to thread our way through the narrow channels which the surge has hollowed out amongst the sand-banks. The captain takes a southwest course, rounding the lighthouse at the corner of the fort; the sails are closely trimmed; the last sandy point is safely coasted, and at length, at seven o'clock in the evening, we are out free upon the wide Atlantic.

The "Chancellor" is a fine square-rigged three-master, of 900 tons burden, and belongs to the wealthy Liverpool firm of Laird Brothers. She is two years old, is sheathed and secured with copper, her decks being of teak, and the base of all her masts, except the mizen, with all their fittings, being of iron. She is registered first class A 1, and is now on her third voyage between Charleston and Liverpool. As she wended her way through the channels of mast-head; but without colors at all, no sailor could have hesitated . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.