Breaking Boundaries: Latina Writing and Critical Readings

Breaking Boundaries: Latina Writing and Critical Readings

Breaking Boundaries: Latina Writing and Critical Readings

Breaking Boundaries: Latina Writing and Critical Readings

Excerpt

Breaking Boundaries has as its primary intention just what the title implies: to reevaluate the paradigmatic and often divisive categories set forth by the literary establishment, whether those be cultural, linguistic, literary, academic, political, or sexual. We focus on an already extensive and rich body of literature written by Latina women, yet virtually unrecognized by institutions of power (universities, departments, publishing houses, media), although, fortunately, there are some exceptions. As scholars, we do not consent to the discriminatory practices that perpetuate this marginalization. It is part of our effort, then, to make this literature less than marginal, to give it visibility and accessibility so that a larger audience can come to know it.

We came together as a panel at the Tenth Symposium of Spanish and Portuguese Bilingualism held at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in November 1986. It was then that we decided to work together as editors to make a book of those papers. With the exception of Nicholasa Mohr's "Puerto Rican Writers in Puerto Rico, Puerto Rican Writers in New York: A Difference Beyond Language", all of the papers were written specifically for this book by authors who have been working in this field.

Whereas it is not possible to make available to readers the entire scope and complexity of Latina writing within the parameters of this one book, we do aim to contribute to a better understanding of the historic and literary processes that give rise to this literature. For this reason, we have chosen a socio-historical approach in both these preliminary considerations and the essay by Sternbach/Ortega. It proved impossible to deal with all the issues concerning Latina discourse, but our book does represent a wide variety of approaches to the Latina texts under discussion. We do hope that exposure to these texts, as well as access to the bibliography, will act as stimuli to encourage further reading of, and research on, Latina . . .

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