A Man of Distinction among Them: Alexander McKee and British-Indian Affairs along the Ohio Country Frontier, 1754-1799

A Man of Distinction among Them: Alexander McKee and British-Indian Affairs along the Ohio Country Frontier, 1754-1799

A Man of Distinction among Them: Alexander McKee and British-Indian Affairs along the Ohio Country Frontier, 1754-1799

A Man of Distinction among Them: Alexander McKee and British-Indian Affairs along the Ohio Country Frontier, 1754-1799

Synopsis

A study of the complexities surrounding the early history of Ohio and a portrait of a central figure in that history - Alexander McKee. McKee, a fur-trader and agent with the British Indian Department served as a cultural mediator - a go-between who linked the native and European worlds.

Excerpt

I first became interested in Alexander McKee while working for the Ohio Historical Society as the site manager at Fort Meigs State Memorial in Perrysburg. in 1988 I was asked to begin research on a proposed museum renovation project at another Ohio Historical Society property, Fort Recovery State Memorial in Mercer County, the site of Arthur St. Clair's 1791 defeat and the 1794 Battle of Fort Recovery. My initial research quickly revealed McKee's important role in both actions. Moreover, I was surprised to learn that McKee conducted his affairs during the 1790s Indian war period from his storehouse at the foot of the Maumee River Rapids, only a short distance from my office at Fort Meigs. Further investigation indicated his long involvement with the Ohio Country Indian nations and his prominent participation in Great Britain's attempt to win and then retain its imperial holdings throughout the Great Lakes region in the second half of the eighteenth century.

McKee was at the center of events along the Ohio frontier during the dozen or so years after the American Revolution that would broadly set the course of the region's history for many years to come. Indeed, these events would profoundly shape the destinies of the United States and Canada and of the area's native peoples for the next two centuries. This was nowhere more true than in his actions along the Maumee River during the 1790s. Anthony Wayne's victory over the confederated Indian nations at Fallen Timbers in 1794 and the subsequent Treaty of Greenville the following year secured uncontested sovereignty over the . . .

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