Countertransference: Theory, Technique, Teaching

Countertransference: Theory, Technique, Teaching

Countertransference: Theory, Technique, Teaching

Countertransference: Theory, Technique, Teaching

Synopsis

A collection of papers on the Oedipus complex, divided into three parts: theory, practice and supervision. Contributors include Joyce McDougall, Hanna Segal, Otto Kernberg and Leon Grinberg.

Excerpt

Grigoris Vaslamatzis

T he contributors to this book invite the reader to explore with them the processes affecting the therapist's mind -- and, occasionally, his body -- during psychoanalytic therapy, and the reasons for which the therapist thinks, feels, and reacts in a particular way.

The full significance of these processes, referred to as "countertransference" since Freud's time, has recently been recognized, resulting in the therapist's use of additional resources so that he or she can understand and help the patient more effectively. If we, as therapists, do not deal with our countertransference, we deprive ourselves of the use of an instrument that may prove invaluable to our work. Let us here recall Freud's statement that "everyone possesses in his own unconscious an instrument with which he can interpret the utterances of the unconscious in other people" (Freud, 1913i, p. 320) and, more specifically with respect to countertransference, that the analyst "must turn his own unconscious like a receptive organ toward the transmitting unconscious of the patient" (Freud, 1912e, p. 115).

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