Essays on Cuban History: Historiography and Research

Essays on Cuban History: Historiography and Research

Essays on Cuban History: Historiography and Research

Essays on Cuban History: Historiography and Research

Synopsis

"A book of immense utility to those who are, or plan to become, students and scholars of Cuban history and society.... Both an overview and a handbook combined into one accessible, well-written volume."--Rebecca J. Scott, University of Michigan

Reflecting three decades of study of one of the most respected scholars of Cuba in the Unied States, these essays examine some of the central issues of historical research of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Cuba.
The first section sets in relief many of the principal themes of Cuban studies, including Protestant missionary activity, the U. S. interventions in 1898, Cuban emigration to the United States, and the development of the Cuban armed forces after 1959.
The second section examines the historical literature itself, especially works written in Cuba and the United States in the last thirty-five years. It looks at the trends in the literature, with emphasis on the ways that historical writing has arrived at an understanding of the Cuban past.
The third section offers a guide to some of the larger research collections, specifically those repositories of important manuscript collections and archival records relating to Cuba. It includes a description of the Cuban National Archives, missionary manuscript collections, and records of the U. S. government.
Contents
Part I. History
Intervention and Collaboration: The Politics of Cuban Independence, 1898-1899
Cubans in Tampa: From Exiles to Immigrants, 1892-1901
The Imperial Design: Politics and Pedagogy in Occupied Cuba, 1899-1902
North American Protestant Missionaries in Cuba and the Culture of Hegemony, 1898-1920
Reminiscences of a "Lector": Cuban Cigar Workers in Tampa
Ybor City Remembered
Army Politics in Socialist Cuba, 1959-1969
Part II. Historiography
Scholarship and the State: Notes on History of the Cuban Republic
U. S.-Cuban Relations: A Survey of Twentieth-Century Historiography
In the Service of the Revolution: Two Decades of Cuban Historiography, 1959-1979
The Cuban Revolution after Twenty-Five Years
History, Historiography, and Cuban Studies
Part III. Research
The Archivo Nacional de Cuba
Record Collections of the Cuban National Archives
La Guerra Libertadora Cubana de los Treinta A os, 1868-1898
Cuba Materials in the Bureau of Insular Affairs Library
Protestant Missionaries in Cuba
Research Perspectives on the Cuban Revolution: A Twenty-Five-Year Assessment
Louis A. P rez, Jr., is J. Carlyle Sitterson Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Among his many books are Slaves, Sugar, and Colonial Society: Travel Accounts of Cuba, 1801-1899, Cuba and the United States: Ties of Singular Intimacy, 1770s-1980s, Cuba: Between Reform and Revolution, and Cuba Under the Platt Amendment, 1902-1934, which received a Choice outstanding academic book award.

Excerpt

The study of the history of Cuba has changed much in the United States during the past three decades. So too has the character of the historiography and the direction of historical research. Thirty years ago in the United States the subject of Cuban history was very much terra incognita. A graduate student's reading list on Cuban historiography during the early 1960s would have found hardly anything beyond the works of Charles E. Chapman, Russell H. Fitzgibbon, David Lockmiller, Irene A. Wright, and Hubert S. Aimes, largely written before 1935, almost all of which were already out of print and of limited value in shedding light on the tumultuous and extraordinary events then occurring in Cuba. Before the decade ended, new names were added to the list, including Robert Freeman Smith and Hugh Thomas, scholars who made important advances in the historiography of Cuba and who were among the first to provide a historical framework through which to understand Cuban events after 1959.

The Cuban revolution set in sharp relief the need to develop a usable history through which to approach an understanding of the Cuban experience. Historiographical concerns of enduring interest to virtually all scholars, issues such as colonialism, slavery, racism, imperialism, and revolution, revealed themselves as part of a historical process with antecedents dating back to the sixteenth century and with implications reaching to the end of the twentieth century. The historical scholarship on Cuba presented a past rich with issues of enormous vitality that . . .

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