Foreign Aid and the Defense of Southeast Asia

Foreign Aid and the Defense of Southeast Asia

Foreign Aid and the Defense of Southeast Asia

Foreign Aid and the Defense of Southeast Asia

Excerpt

This book has grown out of my conviction that the relations beween military and economic assistance are far more important -- and complex -- than is generally realized. This opinion was generated by my experience in Korea (1955) as an economist with the United States economic-aid mission and as a liaison officer to the Military Assistance Advisory Group. It was reinforced by the oversimplified, imprecise analyses in most of the studies of defense assistance that came to my attention in succeeding years. Accordingly, following a few months as a member of the staff of the President's Committee to Study the Military Assistance Program (the Draper Committee) in the summer of 1959, I decided to investigate these relations systematically and thus embarked on the present study.

In the autumn of 1959, I began a series of formal interviews with aid-assistance officials in Washington, D.C., which were continued at intervals until the summer of 1961. In order to get the point of view of American officials in the field and of host-country nationals, I spent over six weeks in South and Southeast Asia in the summer of 1960. During that period (April-June, 1960), I interviewed about a hundred U.S. citizens and Southeast Asians who had varying assistance-program responsibilities, from field advisers to mission chiefs and ambassadors. Most of these interviews occurred in South Vietnam, Laos, Pakistan, and in the headquarters of the Commander in Chief, Pacific, in Hawaii.

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