Formula for Change: Using the Urban Experiment Station Method and the Normative Sponsorship Theory

Formula for Change: Using the Urban Experiment Station Method and the Normative Sponsorship Theory

Formula for Change: Using the Urban Experiment Station Method and the Normative Sponsorship Theory

Formula for Change: Using the Urban Experiment Station Method and the Normative Sponsorship Theory

Excerpt

Is this book for you? It is if you are someone who sees the need for change and is interested and willing enough to commit yourself to doing something about it. It is written for anyone who is responsible for organizing two or more people.

Anyone who watches television or reads newspapers and magazines knows that the world, our country, our cities, our neighborhoods, and our families are in trouble. Poverty, poorly educated people, broken families, and bleak prospects for employment have created a seemingly permanent urban underclass where crime is rampant.

America is a democratic society. Those in power, those who make decisions that affect our lives, do so with the "consent of the governed." Thus, if we don't like the way our cities, schools, churches, and other institutions are running things, we can demand changes. Of course, things change whether you're a part of the change or not. Change can happen to you, or you can decide to change things: "But," you say, "I don't want to get involved -- don't have time...."

You are already involved if you are a living, breathing human being. Someone once said, "If you're not a part of the solution, you're part of the problem." Whatever the size and source of your income, you share some common interests with the rest of the world. To change things you will almost always work with a group or an organization. This organization may itself need to improve the manner in which it serves, and the change you desire to bring about may have to begin here.

Indeed, organizations are an inherent part of any human society. They can achieve great goals when their members are committed to working for the good of the organization and community. They do great harm . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.