Susan B. Anthony: The Woman Who Changed the Mind of a Nation

Susan B. Anthony: The Woman Who Changed the Mind of a Nation

Susan B. Anthony: The Woman Who Changed the Mind of a Nation

Susan B. Anthony: The Woman Who Changed the Mind of a Nation

Excerpt

For a biography of Susan B. Anthony there can never be much new material. The monumental History of Woman Suffrage, compiled by Susan herself, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Matilda Joslyn Gage and Ida Husted Harper, contains most of the facts of her work during fifty-three years for woman's right, as she expressed it, to own and possess herself. Mrs. Harper's minute and painstaking biography, published in two large volumes in 1898, and a third volume written immediately after her death in 1906, is a source book of priceless value to every student of the facts of her remarkable career. Mrs. Harper's book suffered the one disadvantage of being written mainly in Susan's lifetime, and characteristically she refused to permit herself to be represented the towering figure she actually was.

To give Susan the historic background against which she lived and moved I have read many contemporary books and magazines, and I have gone through old files of Garrison's Liberator, and the short-lived paper she so dearly cherished, The Revolution. Especially have I read her many scrapbooks, and those of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, preserved in the Library of Congress, Washington, filled with old letters, speeches and newspaper clippings dating back to 1848, the margins of the books freely scribbled with Susan's comments and corrections. I have searched the yellowing . . .

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