Hungry Lightning: Notes of a Woman Anthropologist in Venezuela

Hungry Lightning: Notes of a Woman Anthropologist in Venezuela

Hungry Lightning: Notes of a Woman Anthropologist in Venezuela

Hungry Lightning: Notes of a Woman Anthropologist in Venezuela

Synopsis

A young student of archaeology receives an offer she can't refuse, the chance to live among the Pume, a South American hunting-and-gathering people who call the tropical Venezuelan savannah home. During their time in the village of Doro Ana, the author and the principal researcher study a vanishing way of life in which cash money, the written word, automobiles, and airplanes are rare and frightening intrusions. Yu, adopted into a Pume family, provides an informal personal account of her two years' stay, describing the daily cycles of birth, growth, romance, sickness, healing, and death among the villagers. Yu's journal entries seek to present, through a young American's eyes, a sketch of her Pume family, their heroic struggle to survive in a changing world, and the power, humor, and mystery of the Pume way of life.

Excerpt

Hungry Lightning is an informal, personal account of events that occurred during anthropological research on the Pumé Indians of Venezuela in the years 1992-1993. For the privacy of the Pumé and their neighbors, I have changed local place names in the text. No scientific data are presented in this work. For scientific findings related to this research project, please see Russell D. Greaves's doctoral dissertation, entitled "Ethnoarchaeological investigation of subsistence mobility, resource targeting, and technological organization among Pumé foragers of Venezuela" (University of New Mexico, 1997).

This book could not have been written without the help of hundreds of people. I thank you all, and I'd like to personally acknowledge some of you here:

--To the Pumé of Doro Aná, for their humor, hospitality, kindness, family feeling, and tolerance in the face of constant invasions of privacy into their everyday lives. With their help, I learned a great deal about how people organize their lives and the world around them. The Pumé fed our research group, taught us their language, built houses for us, carried our gear, helped us survive, and ultimately adopted us as family. I owe them a debt of gratitude that is impossible to describe.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.