People in Ejidos: A Visit to the Cooperative Farms of Mexico

People in Ejidos: A Visit to the Cooperative Farms of Mexico

People in Ejidos: A Visit to the Cooperative Farms of Mexico

People in Ejidos: A Visit to the Cooperative Farms of Mexico

Excerpt

"L and for the landless" is a slogan that has aroused peasants for at least three thousand years. The earliest of the large-scale agrarian movements of this century started in Mexico in 1910, and continues to this day. Of the 15,160,000 persons counted in the 1910 census only 47,939 were landowners. The 1950 census revealed that their number had grown to 3,236,714, out of a population of 25,706,000. "People in Ejidos" accounted for 1,884,116 in 18,027 groups; the ejido evidently has been the largest single factor in broadening the base of landholding in Mexico.

The ejido (pronounced a-heé-do), as the major institution of the revolution, faces tremendous handicaps, including, among others, scarce land, unreliable rainfall, extremely rapid population growth, and a heritage of ignorance, oppression and exploitation. The impressive efforts of thousands of school teachers, doctors, nurses, agricultural engineers and others who have helped the peasants, the growth in stature of the peasants themselves, and the growing strength of their organizations, all testify to the ability of people to rise above their former roles and to exert themselves for the common good.

The success of many of the ejidos proves that such success is possible, even though in both Mex . . .

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