Soviet Strategy in the Nuclear Age

Soviet Strategy in the Nuclear Age

Soviet Strategy in the Nuclear Age

Soviet Strategy in the Nuclear Age

Excerpt

In order to establish the strategic thought and doctrine of an alien military culture, it is first necessary to escape the confines of one's own implicit and unconscious strategic concept. The ideas of others, when these are interpreted in terms of the military or political analyst's own strategic preconceptions, will appear distorted or, often, obsolete. And the comfort derived from a superficial assessment of differing views, in such a manner that these views seem to represent a simple "cultural lag" on the part of our opponent, may obscure the recognition of these views as manifestations of a different underlying doctrine and strategic concept.

Regrettably, such a condition colors much that has been written in the United States about current Soviet military thinking. Now, suddenly prompted by such spectacular technological achievements as sputnik, we tend to attribute all nature of superior concentration of skills to the Soviets. Yet, the idea of Soviet advance or advantage in the realm of military thought rarely, if ever, has been raised. It should be. For Soviet military doctrine figuratively has made a quantum jump from the bayonet age to the thermonuclear age.

The fundamental conclusion of this present analysis is that the Soviets continue, in the thermonuclear era, to adhere essentially to the classical military strategic concept that the path . . .

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