The Revolt of the Mind: A Case History of Intellectual Resistance behind the Iron Curtain

The Revolt of the Mind: A Case History of Intellectual Resistance behind the Iron Curtain

The Revolt of the Mind: A Case History of Intellectual Resistance behind the Iron Curtain

The Revolt of the Mind: A Case History of Intellectual Resistance behind the Iron Curtain

Excerpt

Stalin died on March 5, 1953. The exact time of his death was 9:50 p.m. According to the official medical reports, the direct cause of death was cerebral hemorrhage.

In Moscow, the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, the Council of Ministers, and the Presidium of the Supreme Counciladdressed a letter to every member of the Party and to every Soviet working man and woman: "The heart of Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin, Lenin's brother-in-arms, brilliant upholder of his cause, and wise leader and teacher of the Communist Party and of the Soviet people, has beat for the last time.... The immortal name of Stalin will live forever in the hearts of the Soviet people and of all progressive humanity...."

A committee was formed to organize a funeral worthy of Stalin. The chairman of this committee was none other than Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev.

At the same time, in order to ensure the undisturbed continuity of Soviet life, the state and Party leaders took several steps. Georgi Maksimilianovich Malenkov was appointed Chairman of the Soviet Council of Ministers. Lavrenti Pavlovich Beria, Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov, Nikolai Aleksandrovich Bulganin, and Lazar Moisseyevich Kaganovich became . . .

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