The Genesis of Modern British Town Planning: A Study in Economic and Social History of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

The Genesis of Modern British Town Planning: A Study in Economic and Social History of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

The Genesis of Modern British Town Planning: A Study in Economic and Social History of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

The Genesis of Modern British Town Planning: A Study in Economic and Social History of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Excerpt

T HIS book has been written in the belief that contemporary efforts to improve the quality of urban living are more closely linked to the experience of the last century and a half than is sometimes realised and that they can be fully understood only when set in the context of that experience. Not only our towns themselves but also the methods of improving them that seem both practicable and commendable are the legacy of the past. In surveying part of this legacy and presenting it in relation to the growth of the modern town-planning movement I have been to a considerable extent generalizing from and contrasting the histories of many different towns, as well as examining the ideas and influence of a wide variety of investigators and reformers. I have tried to give the generalizations and contrasts a firm basis of fact but it would, of course, be folly to claim that they rest on a completely exhaustive examination of all the possible sources. The materials of local history since 1800 are so vast that no one could hope to deal exhaustively with more than a very few districts, and though some important gaps have in recent years been most admirably filled, the history of many of the chief towns in this period has still to be made the subject of substantial secondary works. When these histories have been written it may well be that they will suggest changes in the emphasis of the present book, though I have tried to make my selection of material as representative as I could. In the meantime this study is offered as a preliminary survey of the ground.

Its preparation has involved me in debts which it is a pleasure to acknowledge. The book is a revised version of a thesis approved for the award of the degree of Ph.D. in the University of London in 1950. To the advice of my supervisor, Mr. H. L. Beales, and his curious and profound knowledge of Victorian social history it owes . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.