Basic Concepts in Sociology

Basic Concepts in Sociology

Basic Concepts in Sociology

Basic Concepts in Sociology

Excerpt

Max Weber was born on April 21, 1864, in Erfurt, Thuringia (now East Germany), the eldest son of a well situated German family that valued education, culture and citizenship. Max was surrounded by good books from the day he was born and by the time he was fourteen could and did read Homer, Virgil, and Livy fluently in the original. By the time he finished the Gymnasium he had read his way through the forty-volume Weimar edition of Goethe's works, could quote Shakespeare in English and had exercised his critical faculties on the works of Spinoza, Schopenhauer and Kant. Weber began his serious studies at the University of Heidelberg on the faculty of law, but his interests carried over into the fields of economics and philosophy, in all of which he regularly attended lectures.

Despite such a prodigious interest in learning, Weber's student days do not present a uniform picture of the budding bookworm. Max could not make up his mind whether to lead the life of the scholar or that of the gentleman. Probably in order to overcome his ascetic tendencies he joined one of the Burschenschaften (duelling fraternities) and quickly adopted their boisterous way of life and shallow nationalistic views. The picture of crude animal spirit that he presented on one of his visits home was enough to anger his mother into trying to slap some sense of decency back into him. The effect was lasting. This phase and the incident ate important because they . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.