An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals

An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals

An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals

An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals

Synopsis

Part 1: Introductory Material c How to Use this Book c List of Abbreviations c Editor's Introduction n 1 c Life and Early Publishing History n 2 c Hume's General Philosophy n 3 c Background Controversies in Moral Philosophy n 4 c Hume's Moral Philosophy n 5 c The Structure of the Text n 6 c Conclusion: Hume's Influence c The Text Printed in this Edition c Supplementary ReadingPart 2: The Text c An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals n 1 c Of the General Principles of Morals n 2 c Of Benevolence n 3 c Of Justice n 4 c Of Political Society n 5 c Why Utility Pleases n 6 c Of Qualities Useful to Ourselves n 7 c Of Qualities Immediately Agreeable to Ourselves n 8 c Of Qualities Immediately Agreeable to Others n 9 c Conclusion c Appendix 1. Concerning Moral Sentiment c Appendix 2. Of Self-love c Appendix 3. Some Farther Considerations with regard to Justice c Appendix 4. Of Some Verbal Disputes c A DialoguePart 3 c Annotations to the Enquiry c Glossary c References c Index

Excerpt

Disputes with men, pertinaciously obstinate in their principles, are, of all others, the most irk- some; except, perhaps, those with persons, entirely disingenuous, who really do not believe the opinions they defend, but engage in the controversy, from affectation, from a spirit of opposition, or from a desire of showing wit and ingenuity, superior to the rest of mankind. the same blind adherence to their own arguments is to be expected in both; the same contempt of their antagonists; and the same passionate vehemence, in inforcing sophistry and falsehood. and as reasoning is not the source, whence either disputant derives his tenets; it is in vain to expect, that any logic, which speaks not to the affections, will ever engage him to embrace sounder principles.

Those who have denied the reality of moral distinctions, may be ranked among the disingenuous disputants; nor is it conceivable, that any human creature could ever seriously believe, that all characters and actions were alike entitled to the affection and regard of everyone. the difference, which nature has placed between one man and another, is so wide, and this difference is still so much farther widened, by education, example, and habit, that, where the opposite extremes come at once under our apprehension, there is no scepticism so scrupulous, and . . .

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