Diary of Thomas Robbins, D. D., 1796-1854 - Vol. 1

Diary of Thomas Robbins, D. D., 1796-1854 - Vol. 1

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Diary of Thomas Robbins, D. D., 1796-1854 - Vol. 1

Diary of Thomas Robbins, D. D., 1796-1854 - Vol. 1

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The author of this diary, REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D., was born in the town of Norfolk, Connecticut, August 11, 1777. He was the son of the Rev. Ammi Ruhamah and Elizabeth (Le Baron) Robbins. His father was the first minister of the town of Norfolk, holding office from October, 1761, to his death in October, 1813, fifty-two years. The earliest American ancestor in this paternal line was Richard Robbins, of Cambridge, who came from England to this country as early as 1639, settling first at Charlestown, but soon removing to Cambridge, Massachusetts. From him the order of descent was through Nathaniel, born in Cambridge, 1649; Nathaniel, born in Cambridge, 1678; Philemon, born in Cambridge, 1709, a graduate of Harvard College, 1729, and the life-long pastor at Branford, Connecticut, 1732-1781; Ammi Ruhamah, born in Branford, 1740, a graduate of Yale College, 1760, whose ministerial record is given above.

On the maternal side Dr. Robbins traced his line directly back to the honored Governor William Bradford, of Plymouth. This line, downward, ran through William Bradford, Jr., son of the Governor by his second wife, Alice Southworth, née Carpenter; then through David, son of William and Mary Holmes, née Atwood. A daughter of David and Mary was Lydia Bradford, born December 23, 1719. By her marriage, the name Le Baron was brought into this maternal line, and the story connected with this name is curious and romantic.

In the year 1694, a French Privateer, hovering around our shores to capture vessels loaded with grain, was wrecked near the upper end of Buzzard's Bay, and the men on board were rescued and taken off as prisoners of war. This was in the reign of William III. The Treaty of Ryswick brought peace in 1697. The surgeon on board this French Privateer was Francis Le Baron. In the transfer of these prisoners from the head of Buzzard's Bay to Boston, a halt was made at Plymouth. On the day of their arrival, it so happened that a woman of Plymouth had met with an accident, causing a compound fracture of one of her limbs. The local physicians decided that the limb must be amputated. But Dr. Le Baron asked permission to examine the fracture, and decided that he could save the limb, which he did. This led to a petition on the part of the Selectmen of Plymouth to the public authorities, asking that Dr. Le Baron might be released, to become a physician and surgeon at Plymouth. The request was granted. He went there in 1694, married in 1695 Mary Wilder, a native of Hingham, Massachusetts, and became the father of three sons, James, Lazarus, and Francis.

This Lazarus Le Baron, in the year 1743, married, for his second wife, Lydia Bradford, named above, daughter of David. She was then twenty-four years old, but had already lived a brief married life as the wife of Elkanah Cushman. As the wife of Dr. Lazarus Le Baron, she was the mother of seven children, the second of whom was Elizabeth, the wife of the Norfolk minister, and the mother of Dr. Thomas Robbins, the author of this diary.

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