ZIK, a Selection from the Speeches of Nnamdi Azikiwe

ZIK, a Selection from the Speeches of Nnamdi Azikiwe

ZIK, a Selection from the Speeches of Nnamdi Azikiwe

ZIK, a Selection from the Speeches of Nnamdi Azikiwe

Excerpt

Many well-wishers have urged me to arrange for publication the speeches which I have delivered over a number of years. With the help of Mr Alphonso, Okolo, Secretary of the Zik Enterprises Limited, and of Mrs Beryl Glew, Confidential Secretary to the Premier of the Eastern Region, I gathered together a large number of my speeches; Mr Philip Harris has now made a selection from these papers arranged in a series of chapters each dealing with a particular topic.

It is my hope that the publication of this selection from my speeches will enable critics to appraise more intelligently the roôle which I have played in many spheres of activity over three decades. It will, I hope, enable my compatriots to appreciate my unrelenting stand on issues of fundamental importance. It will, I am sure, provide a source of information for those who are interested in the study of Nigerian development.

It has been suggested that it would be helpful if I were to knit this collection of speeches together with a short biographical sketch. I was born in Zungeru in Northern Nigeria in 1904, where my father was serving as a clerk in the Nigeria Regiment. I attended mission schools in Onitsha, Lagos and Calabar before travelling to Lagos for further education in 1921. After a period as a government clerk in the Treasury office in Lagos, I sailed for the United States in 1925. Here I enrolled in Storer College, but soon transferred to Lincoln University and subsequently to Howard University in Washington, D.C. After securing my degree I lectured in political science at Lincoln University and while there obtained postgraduate degrees at Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania. I returned to Nigeria at the end of 1934, but soon moved on to Accra, where in 1935 I became editor of the Accra African Morning Post. In 1938 I returned to Nigeria, where I established the newspaper West African Pilot. After a period of political activity in the Nigerian Youth Movement, I combined . . .

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